Gallery Mint Museum ScrapBook  
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Gallery Mint Museum ~ Box706 EurekaSprings AR 72632
OrderDesk...(888)558-MINT(6468)     Questions...(479)253-5055
 Website...www.gallerymint.com       EMail...GalleryMintMuseum
I absolutely LOVE your idea of creating this scrapbook.
This is a great way of answering questions that come up a lot.
Ron Landis ...Sun, 30 Jul 2000 11:59:06

2005-2006
ScrapBook Subjects
Page
Index
Links
Link...An Instant “Landis” Rarity!
Link...It's the simple things that can be the most fun...
Link...A Numismatic Adventure in Northwest Arkansas
Link...The new dime from the Gallery Mint Museum has a familiar look!
Link...The GOLDEN difference between Uncirculated and Proof
Link...She Finds A Rare Treasure and Ponders Its Past
Link...[ Gone A.W.O.L. for SIX Months! ]
Link...[ Gone fishin' instead of just a wishin'... NOT! ]
Link...Gallery Mint Museum Awarded Non-Profit Status
  Arkansas firm now eligible for grants, tax-deductible donations.

Enlargement scans available on WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM. 
10/14
2006
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An Instant “Landis” Rarity!
    Ron invested literally weeks of work in creating these two dies. The level of detail of the fountain is spectacular. Then... because this copper/silver set was being struck for the 75th Anniversary of the Cincinnati Numismatic Association (CNA) ...they chose to strike only 75 sets of medals. After all of Ron's work. WOW... I'm absolutely astounded!
    It took me quite a while to figure out what “ONE ITANNICNIC” meant. Just so you don't have to follow me down that path... I pulled out what little remaining hair I have ...“Itannicnic” is simply Cincinnati spelled backwards. There has to be a “story” behind this legend but I couldn't find any references to it. If you know about this please let us know.
    Shown below is the original “ONE ITANNICNIC” medal struck for CNA. It, like Ron's, is 38mm in diameter. ~ V-Dubya
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Tyler Davidson Fountain 1871 • Fountain Square Plaza, East Fifth Street • Cincinnati, Ohio
August von Kreling (1819-1876) • bronze, porphyry, granite, water
    This 43-foot fountain is the oldest downtown sculpture and has become the best known and loved symbol of Cincinnati. Water streams from the out-stretched hands of the 9-foot tall female figure representing the "Genius of Water." Below her, four adult figures dramatize the life-sustaining uses of water, four children illustrate the life-enhancing pleasures of water, and four relief panels depict the industrial uses of water. Four drinking spouts on the lower tier of the fountain once had communal cups for pedestrians to use. Local businessman Henry Probasco selected the fountain design from von Kreling's Munich studio and had it cast and erected as a memorial to Davidson, his deceased brother-in-law and business partner. Originally the fountain stood on an esplanade 30 feet south of its present location. In the late 1960's, as a part of the downtown redevelopment plan, the present plaza was created with the fountain as its centerpiece.

10/10
2006
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#101 #302 #031
It's the simple things that can be the most fun...
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    Attached is a raw photo showing how I got the picture of the edge of the medal. I took the cone shaped reflector out of a large flashlight and placed the medal in the bottom of it. This reflects the edge of the medal perfectly in a mirror image. Then using my graphics editor software I selected the medal part and flipped that horizontally, then I selected the entire picture and flipped that. That puts both the edge and the medal in the right view. ~ Clifford Bolling, Sunday, 10/8/2006 8:55AM
    I was dinking around with the coin edge photos and came to realize that when I take a photo of the coin with the reflected edge in a ring around it and do the flipping necessary to make the image right, the photo will actually show the edge from the perspective of the other side of the coin. This is getting a bit complicated, but to get the edge ring to match the rim of the coin, you would need to paste an upside down (rotated 180 degrees) image of the other side of the coin in the ring then rotate the entire image 180 degrees. Whew! Sometimes I think too much! ~ Clifford Bolling, Friday, 10/13/2006 10:18AM


    Some of Cliff's GMM webpages:
Link... 1993-1995 ANNUAL MEDALS produced by THE GALLERY MINT MUSEUM -by Cliff Bolling
Link... Die Varieties of U.S. Coin Replicas produced by THE GALLERY MINT MUSEUM -by Cliff Bolling
Link... THE GALLERY MINT MUSEUM 1796 $1 Die Varieties -by Cliff Bolling
Link... THE GALLERY MINT MUSEUM 1793 1c Die Varieties -by Cliff Bolling

    FYI... J.T.Stanton's material has been trickling into the market for a couple months now. More than one eBay Seller has advertised small lots of cool GMM material as having come from the collection of J.T.Stanton. So far, each dealer has only had a single group from his collection. ~ Clifford Bolling, Tuesday, 10/10/2006 8:05AM
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5/11
2006
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A Numismatic Adventure in Northwest Arkansas
• • • A Visit to the Gallery Mint -by John Kraljevich, Jr • • •
    There was a time in America when 搈echanics didn抰 work on cars. The term mechanic or mechanick referred to a brand of genius that didn抰 necessarily have a college degree, a fine and skilled craftsman involved in what today is called the 搕echnical arts. A mechanic could be a cooper, or a stonemason, or a machinist, or a blacksmith. They were held up as model citizens, as living the American ideal of creativity married with old-fashioned useful pragmatism. To quote Horace (and, later, the Rosa Americana coinage), what they produced was 搖tile et dulce敆useful and pleasant.
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• • • www.GalleryMintMuseum.org • • •


5/7
2006

The new dime from the Gallery Mint Museum has a familiar look.
“Arkansas company re-creates a classic American design”
• • • COIN COMMENT -by George Stebinsky ~ Sunday, May 07, 2006 • • •
    The new dime from the Gallery Mint Museum has a familiar look!
    I bought a 2005 Mercury dime at the Central States Numismatic Society show in Columbus last weekend, 61 years after U.S. mints stopped producing the coins.
    The Mercury dime, which on the front shows Liberty wearing a winged freedom cap, ceased production in 1945. The next year, wartime President Franklin D. Roosevelt's likeness was placed on the dime, both to honor the man and raise money for the fight against polio.
    Roosevelt, a Democrat who led the nation out of the Great Depression and through World War II, was struck by polio as a young man. The March of Dimes, which now battles birth defects, was created to defeat polio, a crippling infection among children before modern medicine largely banished the disease in the 1950s.
    Decades after the last official Mercury dime was produced, a tiny, private nonprofit mint in Eureka Springs, Ark., has recreated the coin and dated it for the new millennium.
    The Mercury design, considered the finest ever to adorn an American 10-cent piece, was created by artist Adolph A. Weinman. He also designed the 1916-1947 Walking Liberty half dollar. The coins were part of a remarkable redesign of American coinage from 1907 to 1916, inaugurated by President Teddy Roosevelt after seeing the artistry of coins produced in ancient Greece.
    Teddy Roosevelt thought that a great nation should have a great coinage and commissioned the nation's finest artists to make over U.S. money.
    On the Mercury dime, Liberty's cap refers to the hat that freed slaves wore as a sign of their status. Weinman added wings to the cap to symbolize freedom of thought, a cherished American ideal.
    The Gallery Mint Museum coin takes Weinman抯 concept a step further by rendering it in ultrahigh relief. Modern coins have very low relief the design barely rises from the coin's background field so that they can be stamped in great numbers by high-speed presses and stacked.
    Ancient Greek coins were struck one at a time. Designs were in such high relief that the coins were almost sculptural. On the Gallery Mint piece, Liberty rises above the coin's rim. As a coin, it would be impossible to stack and impractical to produce in great numbers, but as a work of art based on a coin, it's a wonder to behold.
    Gallery Mint craftsmen, who set up a display at the coin show, re-create old coins but don't produce exact reproductions. Each die is sunk by hand, so that there are minor differences in features such as the placement of letters and the style of the design. Gallery Mint is a nonprofit museum dedicated to the rediscovery and preservation of ancient minting techniques. Board members include coin curators from the Smithsonian Institution and Colonial Williamsburg.
    They don't sell their work, though, at face value. My dime cost $15.
    Gallery Mint also produces 2005 Indian nickels, many U.S. coins from the 1700s and even some coins of ancient Athens. It can be reached at www.gallerymint.com or by mail at Box 706, Eureka Springs, Ark. 72632.
• • • The Columbus Dispatch • • •


2/20
2006

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The GOLDEN difference between Uncirculated and Proof
   This is a 1796 Small Eagle $10 gold coin, made by the famous Gallery Mint Museum about 1996. Made using same methods as the original, hand-engraved dies, and struck on a screw press without collar. Exact size (33 mm, larger than current half dollar), weight 17.50 grams, .9167 (22K) fine gold . Contains OVER a half ounce of pure gold, eagles were discontinued in 1804 (just like silver dollar, but some were actually dated 1804), when series was resumed in 1838, weight was reduced to .48 oz pure gold. ~ Bert A. Schlosser... Saturday, Feb-11-06 11:44:22PST
   This one is a Cameo Proof with deep mirrors and full frost on the devices. Absolutely beautiful, a real head-turner in any display case. ~ Bert A. Schlosser... Sunday, Feb-19-06 06:54:12PST
   The difference between uncirculated and proof is readily apparent above with these two beautiful golden eagles from the bench of Ron Landis!
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   Seven gold ingots were recovered aboard the S.S. Central America which sank September 12, 1857. Engraver Ron Landis fashioned new coining dies based on Baldwin & Company's extremely rare "Horseman" coin issued in 1850. Only 4,006 exquisite proofs made. ~ Robert Hughes... Wednesday, Feb-01-06 14:50:09PST
“Horseman” Commemorative Mintages
J&H
Ingot#
Qty.
Minted
4050
4220
4258
4282
4293
4328
4330
1,145
1,070
249
385
116
346
213
  3,524
   So... when I saw these two Baldwin $10 “Horseman” commemoratives I first thought they were proof and uncirculated specimens also. Reading the slab inserts indicates that both are proof specimens. The number in the lower right corner appears to be the J&H Ingot# and a specimen sequence number. That means that the specimen on the left is the 288th specimen struck and the specimen on the right is the 866th specimen struck... both from the first ingot, #4050.
   From all of this I conclude the difference in appearance may possibly be two different dies ...or... perhaps the process of doing an additional 578 strikes between these two specimens ...or... it could be as simple as varying striking pressures. It seems unlikely that the difference is just the photography and lighting but... Who knows!?!
   Originally these beautiful “Horseman” commemoratives sold in the $1,550-$1,750 price range. The two specimens shown above just sold on eBay at a bit over $900 each. ~ Verne R. Walrafen
WWW-Link: Monaco Financial
WWW-Link: Ship Of Gold - Historical Relics, An Epic Story and Own a Treasure
WWW-Link: Ship of Gold - Journey Through History
SB-Link: Keep Your Eyes Open!
SB-Link: Our First Glimpse Of The Horseman
SB-Link: Still Watching For The Horseman
SB-Link: Presented by Monaco Financial, LLC
SB-Link: A horse is a horse, of course, of course


12/23
2005
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She Finds A Rare Treasure and Ponders Its Past
   "1991 silver medal by Ron Landis of the Gallery Mint 'Dedicated to the Preservation of Numismatic Arts' on the reverse. Obverse: A nude Nike inspects an old coin she has found in a stream 'She finds a rare treasure and ponders its past'. Aqueduct and castle in background. In addition to the usual obverse and reverse dies, Ron has carefully engraved an amazingly intricate edge collar with columns and many cherubs engaged in all the steps of coin production. Ron related to me that he had to actually pour the molten silver into the collar, and then strike it dozens of times to fill in all the detail. The edge is engraved with my initials 'JKK' and 'Ron Landis 1 of 4'. About Uncirculated. -by Jonathan K. Kern"
   This makes three separate legends for the "Winged Lady" 5oz medals that I know about at this writing: 1) The Winged Lady Finds a Mysterious Coin and Wonders, 2) She Finds a Rare Treasure and Ponders Its Past, and 3) Gallery Mint Museum.
   We have visited these wonderful medals three times previously; High Relief 5oz Silver Medal, Dedicated to the Preservation of the Numismatic Arts and The Winged Lady Finds A Mysterious Coin... ~ Verne R. Walrafen... Friday, December 23, 2005

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Gone A.W.O.L. for SIX Months!
   Just because my initials are "VW" it doesn't mean that they stand for "Van Winkle" even though it might seem that way to my fellow GMM aficionados. As many of you know I've been concentrating on my carved nickel collection and on building/maintaining the Original Hobo Nickel Society's website. I know that effort will continue after I return from Florida in mid-January but I do hope to spend some time adding material here to keep our Gallery Mint Museum ScrapBook interesting. Good intentions and all that... we shall see. ~ Verne R. Walrafen... Friday, December 23, 2005

Gone fishin' instead of just a wishin'... NOT!
“Buick LeSabre”
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All credit to Harold Ensley for this title.
Regrettably, V-Dubya has had to cancel a planned 
“2005 Walkabout” of the great NorthWestern USA.
Our SouthWest coast Oregon friends had other plans.
So to console ourselves we went new car shopping.
Now I can't even afford to go tease a few Sturgeons!
Click for 360deg Tour (requires Macromedia Flash Player.) Click for 360deg Tour (requires Macromedia Flash Player.)         “Chevrolet SSR”         Click for 360deg Tour (requires Macromedia Flash Player.) Click for 360deg Tour (requires Macromedia Flash Player.)
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6/17
2005

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Gallery Mint Museum Awarded Non-Profit Status
   Arkansas firm now eligible for grants, tax-deductible donations.
   (Eureka Springs, AR) − In a move culminating 13-years of planning by its founders, the Gallery Mint Museum (GMM) announced it has been granted non-profit 501(c)(3) status by the state of Arkansas. The move allows the popular mint to immediately begin organizing a museum of minting technology.
   “It was always our dream to establish a museum that would preserve the history, craftsmanship and artifacts associated with the minting of coins and printing of paper money.” said GMM co-founder Ron Landis. “We now have the organizational structure and legal recognition to do so.”
   Officially known as the Gallery Mint Museum Foundation, Inc., the new non-profit organization is a separate entity from the Gallery Mint, Inc. “The Gallery Mint will continue to operate as a for-profit company. We are two separate entities now.” explained Landis.
   GMM will retain a number of consultants over the next few months as they build towards the opening of their numismatic museum, tentatively in 2006. “Joe would be thrilled to see our dream coming true!” said Landis, in reference to his partner Joe Rust, who died earlier this year. A fund-raising campaign will be announced shortly.
   For more information about the Gallery Mint Museum Foundation, contact Mike Ellis at POB 706, Eureka Springs, AR 72632; telephone 888-558-MINT; FAX: 479-253-5056; or via email at gmmmike@arkansas.net.