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Gallery Mint Museum Box706 EurekaSprings AR 72632 
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I absolutely LOVE your idea of creating this scrapbook.
This is a great way of answering questions that come up a lot. 
Ron Landis ...Sun, 30 Jul 2000 11:59:06
2001
ScrapBook Subjects
Page
Index
Links
Link: Nagy, Maris, NJNS Lot#7 And The Real GMM Deerhead
Link: A Pantograph For The Guys?
Link: Maris62.5 Before And After
Link: Creating Castaing Machine Cheeks
Link: Death By Clashing
Link: Death Of A Die ... AKA "Death Dollars"
Link: [ Frank Gasparro Medal Sought! ]
Link: The S.S. Central America
Enlargement scans available on WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM. 
11/19
Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
Maris#34 "Deerhead" Electrotype
  • Nagy, Maris, NJNS Lot#7 And The Real GMM Deerhead
       First off, let's talk about Link:The Coins of Colonial and Early America, A Project of the Robert H. Gore, Jr. Numismatic Endowment University of Notre Dame, Department of Special Collections, by Louis Jordan. The level of information to be found there quite simply boggles this old man's poor tired brain. With-in that extensive website I found Link:New Jersey Coppers 1786-1790 and there I found Link:New Jersey Die Charts which gives you links to a circa 1940 photograph of the Stephen K. Nagy plate of electrotypes of NJ specimens on large zinc sheets. This plate is known today as the Maris plate because it was used to illustrate Maris's New Jersey book which, while certainly available from a multitude of sources, I found offered here: Link:Coins of New Jersey by E. Maris.
       Some of the individual electrotypes in those four photographs are extremely dark so I dropped the scans into my graphics editor and, if you are reading this from a Gallery Mint Museum ScrapBook CD-ROM, you can use the following links to view the modified Link:Upper Left, Link:Upper Right, Link:Lower Left and Link:Lower Right quadrant scans ...or... the following links to view the original Notre Dame Link:UL, Link:UR, Link:LL and Link:LR quadrant scans from the CD-ROM.
       For your convenience here are links to view the WWW original Notre Dame Link:UL, Link:UR, Link:LL and Link:LR quadrant scans but be patient because they are HUGE files.
       The reason I went searching for Nagy/Maris references was because I was told that the Maris#34 obverse die was called, by Maris and thus by those who specialize in this neat area of numismatics, the "Deerhead" die. I also knew that, in my SBsubject Link:New Jersey Maris8F NJNS 1996 Auction, I had documented LOT #7: "Deerhead Obverse with NJNS Reverse Mule. This is the Deerhead obverse featured in Coin World. Presumable the only one made." I puzzled over why no mention was made if it was struck from a 1787 dated die instead of the 1786 dated die used for the other 99 strikes. THEN the lights came on... Deerhead meant Maris#34 which meant 1787 to experts like the fine folks of the New Jersey Numismatic Society (NJNS). There was no need for them to elaborate that the Deerhead specimen had a different date from the normal issue strikes.
       Moving on, let's discuss "The Real GMM Deerhead" die. The GMM deerhead die was my first "practice die", is a very loose interpretation of the original deerhead and does not have the WM intitials. Only a few of the GMM deerhead pieces were struck, and then I annealed the die to do some retouching on it. I never did the retouch, and forgot that the die was no longer hard. I think I may have struck one for the NJNS which pretty much destroyed the die. Ron Landis...Mon, 19 Nov 2001 11:22:30
    Click for "Wrong Sized" 1787, The Real GMM Dearhead or NJNS Lot#7 Mockup enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
    "Wrong Sized" 1787           The Real GMM Dearhead           NJNS Lot#7 Mockup
       Shown above... left and center ...are the two dies that I felt were candidates for having been used to strike the NJNS Lot#7 "Deerhead" specimen. Ron tells me that his Deerhead die is the center image above ...BUT... did the folks at NJNS take the "Deerhead" nomenclature from a flip insert that Ron or Adam wrote on ...OR... did they call their Lot#7 "Deerhead", independent of what the GMM Guys would have called it, simply because it was a 1787 die while all the other strikes used a 1786 obverse die?
       My initial assumption was that the "Wrong Sized" 1787 die was the die used for the NJNS Lot#7 Deerhead specimen because it was the same diameter as the NJNS 700th Meeting reverse die. Take note of the right image above that I created as a mockup to show how much smaller the NJNS 700th Meeting reverse die (and the "Wrong Sized" 1787 obverse die) are than The Real GMM Deerhead obverse die. Just the very tips of the dentils would have been evident around the circumference of the struck specimen if The Real GMM Deerhead die was truly used. Can anybody look at, photograph or scan the NJNS Lot#7 specimen and help us resolve this quandry?
    Click for Obverse or Reverse enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
    "Wrong Sized" 1787/NJNS 700th Meeting Mule 28.5mm
       Additional support for my assumption came when I purchased a "Wrong Sized" 1787/NJNS 700th Meeting Mule specimen from the Hardcastle hoard in a recent eBay auction. It sure "sounded" like an example of the NJNS Lot#7 specimen to me. Not only that... but the horse's forelock looks like a deer's antler to this old man... note the closeup scan below. I even see a similar "antler" on the Maris#34 electrotype although I admit that it is very weak in that image. Perhaps my eyes are playing tricks on me!
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
       Since my recently acquired mule came from the Hardcastle hoard I figured that, while he was striking the NJNS Lot#7 Deerhead specimen, he simply struck two and held one back for himself. I've learned that apparently logical assumptions can get a fellow in a lot of hot water... my wife taught me that one!
    Click for Obverse or Reverse enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
    "Wrong Sized" 28.5mm 1787 New Jersey Cent
       You most likely think that all this pretty much exhausts the GOOD NEWS! but I am here to tell you that, if so, then you are sadly mistaken my friend. It turns out that... while excavating in my midden heap in search of research material for this SBsubject ...I came across a different specimen struck with this very same "Wrong Sized" 1787 obverse die. Please... I am forgetful but not THAT forgetful. I knew I had this COOL specimen but I had nothing intelligent to say about it and I had no inkling that this might be the "NJNS Lot#7" Deerhead die!
       I had described Ron's "Wrong Sized" 1787 obverse die (the correct size would have been 31mm) in the SBsubject Link:Captured In Wax! in which I said; "The first impression is of the die Ron created based on the size of the previous 1986 New Jersey cent he had produced. It is roughly 28.5mm in diameter and was never used in a production mode. I would consider it to be a pattern die although a rather unusual pattern because of the reason it was not used. Ron discarded this attempt when he found out that the size of the original coin was considerably larger...he had to start over from scratch."
       Finally, shown above is a "Wrong Sized" 1787 specimen complete with the reverse die that was created for that obverse die. This may be the first time anyone has published these "Wrong Sized" 1787 New Jersey Cent obverse and reverse dies together even though Czapla says there were 18 specimens struck from these dies! There was a composite picture published in a GMM flyer circa 1994 or 1995 that included the obverse die without any comment on the piece that I am aware of. That composite picture was shown here in the ScrapBook in the SBsubject Link:Searching Old GMM Publicationns. I also understand that there was a picture published in Coin World but I do not know if it showed both dies or just the obverse die. In fact, not having seen the Coin World article I'm not even certain it showed either of these dies. Can anybody direct me to a copy of that Coin World article, presumably circa 1994 or 1995?
       Having this pair of very special specimens is another high point in my GMM collecting experience! If ANYONE has additional information that would alter any of my conclusions about these pieces then PLEASE contact me so I can set the record straight before my ignorance and suppositions do irreparable damage. Remember... "Quoting one is plagiarism; Quoting many is research." EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

Deerhead / NewJerseyCent SBsubjects
Link:New Jersey Maris8F NJNS 1996 Auction
Link:Captured in Wax
Link:Nagy, Maris, NJNS Lot#7 And The Real GMM Deerhead
Link:A GMM Deerhead Tracked To Its Lair
Link:Landis Sample Featured In Coin World
Link:Once Upon A Time In Coin World

11/17
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Click for

Top
Right
,

Center
Right
,

Bottom
Right
,

Bottom
Center


or

Bottom
Left


enlargement
on CD-ROM
  • A Pantograph For The Guys?
    Click for enlargement or
    full picture on CD-ROM

    Full picture available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
    The Guys
       Here is what the eBay Seller had to say about this COOL machine: COIN REDUCING MACHINE: This is a reducing machine in working condition for production of metals, coins etc... makes very accurate reproduction of the original artist model. abmachinery...Nov-02-01 06:20:43
       When I checked out the Seller's website they had this machine listed under the Pantograph subtitle. My dictionary says; pan穞o穏raph n. An instrument for copying a plane figure to a desired scale, consisting of styluses for tracing and copying mounted on four jointed rods in the form of a parallelogram with extended sides. I'm not certain if "plane figure" is the wording I'd use for what this reducing machine does since it reduces a three-dimensional model of a coin/medal to a different scale three-dimensional version of the model. Maybe they just didn't have a good subtitle to put a coin reducing machine in!
       Anyway... it is my understanding that the guys have purchased this COOL machine to add to their museum. Knowing Ron and Joe I'd guess it won't just sit around but will be put into production. I look forward to seeing what new creations they come up with now that they are adding this machine's capabilities to their repertoire. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

11/16
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
1787 New Jersey cent BEFORE and AFTER the added die crack.
Click for
Wax BEFORE
or
Copper AFTER
enlargement
on CD-ROM
  • Maris62.5 Before And After
       It pays to keep your eyes open when excavating Ron Landis' midden heap. I was fortunate to find a wax impression of GMM's Maris62.5 1787 New Jersey cent, which ceased production on 31 August 1997, that was created during the engraving of the die BEFORE Ron added the simulated die crack. As you all certainly must know by now... I am enamored by anything different and unusual related to GMM and my friend and master engraver Ron Landis. This outstanding wax die impression certainly qualifies!
       My corresponding friend Cliff Bolling has this to say about the Maris62.5 issue: It seems the obverse of the 1787 NJ piece was struck 2 ways, first with the die crack much less prominent, going behind the lower plow beam, and then re-engraved to strengthen the crack, making it go over the lower plow beam. I have about 15 of the 1787's and all are the first type. According to the mintage figures, only 515 were struck from the earlier version and 1,609 from the re-engraved version. How come I only have the earlier variety? I don't think I have seen the strengthened die crack version... perhaps someone can enlighten us on this subject. Or... perhaps the Czapla documention Cliff is reading is incorrect. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

11/10
  • Creating Castaing Machine Cheeks
       While rummaging around in a directory on the Gallery Mint Museum's home website I found these two interesting graphics files. The first one (shown above) clearly illustrates how Castaing machine/edge mill dies are created. The Castaing machine is a device invented by French engineer Jean Castaing, which added the edge lettering and devices to early U.S. coins before they were struck. This machine was used until close collar dies were introduced which applied the edge device in the striking process. The final dies (shown at the bottom of the picture) apply incuse edge lettering to the edge of coin blanks (Type1 planchets) to form coin planchets (Type2 planchets) with upset edges and edge lettering. The second one (shown below) is a rare view of a group of GMM hubs and master dies entitled "Die Sinker's Hell". I found it interesting although not nearly as cool as the previous one showing how edge mill dies are created. I hope you find these of some small interest. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

11/9
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Click for

Large
Letter
Clashed


or

Clashed
Die
Closeup


enlargement
on CD-ROM
  • Death By Clashing
       Unlike death by lashing it doesn't take more than one to get the job done! My friend Cliff Bolling sent me these great scans of three GMM dollars he just acquired from the Hardcastle hoard. These three specimens all share the same obverse die which Michael L. Czapla, III, called the First Uncirculated Obverse and he tells us that this obverse die was used from 10/26/96 through 2/19/97. Above is a clashed die dollar specimen struck on 1/18/97 at the end of the die's life. I have seen two of these pieces and both had hand-written inserts with 1/18/97 on them. Mr. Czapla has documented that only 10 specimens were struck after this die set was clashed.
       Below is a specimen from the same set of dies before they were damaged by being clashed and a specimen struck from the same obverse die paired with the Small Letter proof reverse die that was converted to an uncirculated die. This is a wonderful set to have the good fortune to acquire and I envy Cliff... congratulations my friend! EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Click for

Large
Letter
Unclashed


or

Small
Letter


enlargement
on CD-ROM

11/7
Obverses
Click for
larger
First
Left
cracked
die state,
Second
Middle
partial cud
die state
or
Third
Right
partial cud
die state
scan
on CD-ROM
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Reverses
Click for
larger
First
Left
cracked
die state,
Second
Middle
partial cud
die state
or
Third
Right
partial cud
die state
scan
on CD-ROM
  • Death Of A Die ... AKA "Death Dollars"
       No... not the deadly "Death Dollars" of Muera Huerta fame. Anyone caught carrying one of those infamous coins, by the Mexican Federalistas during the 1910-1917 Mexican Revolution, are rumored to have been stood up against the nearest adobe wall and shot. These less deadly GMM "Death Dollar" creations carry no such ownership penalty.
       In a recent eBay auction I managed to capture four of the five stunning 1796 dollar strikes from Adam Hardcastle's hoard shown here. I already had the one I didn't get this time on eBay (the middle one shown above) so I didn't compete for it and it went to another GMM collector.
       The obverse die that came to pieces as these Death Dollars were created is the one Michael L. Czapla, III, called the Third Uncirculated Obverse die which is his Second Obverse Proof Obverse die that was converted to an Uncirculated die.
       I have taken some, hopefully slight, editing liberties with Mark Honea's descriptions of these five eBay lots in order to eliminate the repetitive text there-in. Here is the "meat" of what Mark had to tell us, on October 25, 2001, about these GMM creations:
       These five lots trace the end of the production life of a 1796 Draped Bust Dollar die, as produced by the Gallery Mint Museum. All five pieces being offered here are struck from the same obverse die (in varying stages of disintegration). The first piece is struck from a Small Letters reverse die, while the last four are all struck from the same Large Letters reverse die (which is also going through its own problems). As with all of the Gallery Mint's products, these are struck on a planchet of the original specifications (.8924+ Pure Silver), and using the same technology as that available to the early U.S. Mint (i.e., on a Screw Press).
       In the first stage, which began on the 19th of March, 1997, there is a die break visible on the obverse, which begins at approximately 5:00, and then runs upwards along the perimeter of the coin (through the stars and the majority of LIBERTY, stopping just after passing through the "I" in LIBERTY).
       In the second stage, which began on the 25th of August, 1997, the first large die break on the obverse has extended upwards through Liberty's bust at 5:00, and a piece of the die has actually broken away from 5:00 to 3:30. In addition, the smaller die break below Liberty from stage one has now extended upwards behind Her, ending even with the bow in the ribbon in Her hair. On the reverse (the first struck with the Large Letters die), there is a die break which begins in the "E" in STATES, and extends downward through the left side of the wreath, ending below the bow at the bottom of the wreath.
       In the third stage, which began in September, 1997, the first large die break on the obverse now extends at the top through all of LIBERTY, and a secondary break extends from between "I" and "B" upwards to the rim. In addition, the smaller die break below Liberty from stage one has now extended upwards all the way to the "LI" in LIBERTY. The reverse (the second struck with the Large Letters die), is the same stage as it was in Stage Two. Approximately 10 pieces were struck with the obverse and reverse dies at this stage of disintegration.
       In the fourth stage, which began on the 1st of October, 1997, the dies were "Clashed", or struck together without a planchet in between them. This caused additional extensions of both the obverse and reverse die breaks from Stage Three, in addition to transferring a great degree of the reverse dies' design to the obverse die, and vice versa. The reverse (the third struck with the Large Letters die), has several additional die breaks beyond those from Stage Three. Approximately 8 pieces were struck with the obverse and reverse dies at this stage of disintegration.
       In the fifth stage, which began on the 4th of October, 1997. The dies breaks on both the obverse and reverse are even more extensive than from Stage Four, but the really dramatic aspect of this final stage is the extension of the "Cud" from Stage Two. This Cud is now HUGE, and extends from 5:00 all the way upwards to 11:30. The reverse (the fourth struck with the Large Letters die), has more severe die breaks than those from Stage Four. Approximately 5 pieces were struck with the obverse and reverse dies at this stage of disintegration.

       Mr. Czapla provided the following mintage documentation in his Summary of Gallery Mint Reproductions ... 1796 Liberty Draped Bust Dollar - Standard Issue:
    Obverse Die Breaks (various progressions) ... 41
    First Stage Obverse Cud ... 10
    Second Stage Obverse Cud ... 12
    Single Clash Dies & Massive Obverse Cud ... 8 (1)
    Double Clash Dies & Massive Obverse Cud ... 5
    (1) We suspect these single clash strikes may have been from 5:00-3:30 Cud
    dies not Massive Cud dies. Should we find a single clash strike from
    Massive Cud dies then we will modify our stated suspicion of course.

       I have previously provided Mr. Czapla's detailed description of the circumstances surrounding the creation of the final stage, MASSIVE CUD, strikes from this set of dies at Link:The End Of A Die's Life. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
Obverses
Click for
Fourth
Left
partial cud
clashed
die state
or
Fifth
Right
full cud
DOUBLE
clashed
die state
enlargement
on
CD-ROM
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Reverses
Click for
Fourth
Left
partial cud
clashed
die state
or
Fifth
Right
full cud
DOUBLE
clashed
die state
enlargement
on
CD-ROM
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
Frank Gasparro Medal Sought!
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM    Following is what my friend Mike Wallace has to say about the beautiful bust of liberty used on the 1969 ANA Convention medal (shown at left): Frank Gasparro was the U.S. Mint's chief engraver when discussion of a smaller-sized dollar coin came about. Gasparro hoped he would get the opportunity to create a classic design. He prepare sketches and models for an obverse featuring a flowing hair Miss Liberty with a pole and cap behind her head. Gasparro's proposed reverse design featured an eagle flying over a mountain, 13 stars and the sun's rays (shown above). The obverse motif is the same one used on the medals (39mm bronze, 39mm silver and 20mm bronze) that Gasparro designed for the 1969 American Numismatic Association's convention medal (shown at left and right). Mike Wallace Link:Frank Gasparro's Proposed Liberty Head Design.
   Was the 1969 ANA Convention Badge created with Gasparro's Liberty Head Design also? I suspect it was and I am interested in acquiring specimens of both the 1969 ANA badges and medals. If you have any information or suggestions as to how a person might accomplish this goal please contact me. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
   Just as I expected... Richard Sutter just EMailed me the following two SUPER scans. Thanks Richard!
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM

I finally found all three medals and both badges!
Verne R. Walrafen - December 2001
10/24
Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
Hey Buddy! Ya got change for a $50?
Click for
$50 gold
Obverse
or
Reverse
enlargement
on CD-ROM

Ron Landis
wearing
his preferred headgear!

Ron's additions to the ribbon that was on the original die.
  • The S.S. Central America
    Click this image to visit the Bowers and Merena Galleries
    Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
       When the United States Mail Steamship Central America sank in deep water off the coast of the Carolinas during a monstrous 1857 hurricane... Well... there isn't any need for me to replicate the EXTENSIVE and well written text available to you at Link:America's Lost Treasure The S.S. Central America: OVERVIEW. It is absolutely worth your time to read the super set of webpages available to us there.
       Now then... what has all this to do with Ron Landis and the Gallery Mint Museum? Ron, Joe, Timothy and Adam spent several weeks in California striking 2.5 ounce $50 gold pieces from August 20 to September 12, 2001. Ron created the working dies from the original Kellogg & Company $50 dies used in 1855. They even hauled their 16,000-pound press, previously used at the San Francisco Mint between 1973 and 1998, BACK to California to strike these wonderful creations.
       If you check out Link:America's Lost Treasure The S.S. Central America: Commemorative "coins" you will learn what they have been working on so diligently for several months now. I got to hold two of the large gold bars recovered from the S.S. Central America in my lap on one of my trips to Eureka, Springs last year. I watched as the guys preserved the ingots' historical assayers' marks for posterity. They carefully cut and milled the faces of the bars to retain the top layer of gold that contained the fundamental information, such as the ingot's weight and fineness, as well as the Kellogg & Humbert imprint. It was really cool to see gold chips spinning out of the saw cut as the bars were sliced. Additionally, I got to hold the original $50 dies from 1855... talk about a real sense of history.
       If you have some spare small change then you might be interested in acquiring one of the roughly 5,000 gold pieces that the guys struck in California. Check out: Link:Bowers and Merena Galleries. If you accidentially get two shipped to you I sure could use one for Christmas! Maybe your significant other would consider buying us each one for the holidays because we have been so good this year. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
    Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
1855 $50 Gold
SS Central
America

Commemorative
Mintages
Proof strikes
2001 Day
8/20 1 493
8/21 2 84
8/22 3 126
8/23 4 109
8/24 5 25
8/25 6 128
8/26 7 200
8/27 8 156
8/28 9 50
8/29 10 93
8/30 11 56
8/31 12 483
9/01 13 105
9/02 14 209
9/03 15 487
9/04 16 64
9/05 17 123
9/06 18 203
9/07 19 223
9/08 20 101
9/09 21 104
9/10 22 153
9/11 23 99
9/12 24 587
Total 4,461
Uncirculated
strikes
2001 Day
8/26 7 100
9/03 15 93
9/07 19 99
9/12 24 200
Total 492
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